Wyrwane z kontekstu – Engaging Experience: A New Perspective of User Experience with Physical Product

W ramach konferencji Human Centered Design 2009 opublikowany został ciekawy, przeglądowy artykuł “Engaging Experience: A New Perspective of User Experience with Physical Products”  autorstwa Chun-Juei Chou oraz Chrisa Conleya. Poniżej kilka fragmentów. Polecam również cały artykuł :)

The Experience Economy concerns how to engage customers in commercial activities. Pine and Gilmore develop the experience realms, to illustrate four examples of engaging experience. The two dimensions, active-passive participation and absorption-immersion characterize how people engage. In active participation, people become participants, actors or even players rather than bystanders in activities. In passive participation, people attend, appear in or are exposed to activities. Absorption means that people need to absorb information spread throughout in activities, whereas immersion means that people regard the spread information as the atmosphere or background unnecessary to be further processed. According to the experience realms, four examples of engaging experience are provided:

  • Entertainment engagement: When a person pays to join in an activity, he is entertained by the activity through his senses and participation. The person has little disturbance to the activity, leaving it essentially untouched. Being a volunteer in a magic show, shouting with crowds in a baseball game, and rocking and beating in a Jazz Festival are examples of entertainment engagement.
  • Education engagement: When a person pays to join in an activity, he creates something as a part of the activity and enjoys the result. For example, in a cooking class, the apprentices join in food preparation, practice cooking and eat delicious cuisine. Each type of participation is education engagement.
  • Escapist engagement: When a person pays to join in an activity, he escapes tem- porarily from his normal, daily reality. The person is interested in the activity be- cause it is not always available in his daily life. Examples of environments that enable escapist engagement include casinos, cyberspace, and theme parks, etc.
  • Aesthetic engagement: When a person pays to join in an activity, he is attracted by an interesting aspect of the activity. The person has little disturbance to the activity, leaving it essentially untouched. Eating in front of a chef who is skillfully processing food, drinking coffee in Starbucks to enjoy the atmosphere, etc. are examples of aesthetic engagement.

I dalej:

In terms of theatrics, at least four elements are necessary to compose an activity. They are performance, stage, prop and character. To define, a performance is the peripheral activity that a product enables to attract or prompt the user. A stage is what a product operates or what the user responds to. A prop is the product property that enables the user to involve in the performance on the stage. A character is who the user plays. For example, in the case of “Glass Toaster”, watching bread toasted is a performance. The toaster itself is a stage because it displays how the bread changes from white to brown. The transparent case of the toaster is a prop. The user plays a character who visually engages in the toasting process.

In a different point of view, engaging experiences require peoples’ active participation. How people actively participate in an activity can be aligned with three different levels: theme, central activity and supporting activity. A theme is a subject or a particular idea that runs throughout the user-product interaction. A central activity is what the user does in order to experience the theme. A supporting activity is what the user does to support the central activity. For example, Disney World is a theme park full of legends and stories for children. Visitors who enjoy in different stories participate in different central activities. Within each central activity, visitors can take pic- tures with the cartoon character(s), play games or have fun in each cartoon story, each of which is a supporting activity.

Clearly, various activities that engage people can be described by the seven entities mentioned above. They can be used to design/describe a specific engaging experience enabled by a product.

Źródło: Engaging Experience: A New Perspective of User Experience with Physical Products, Chun-Juei Chou and Chris Conley, First International Conference, HCD 2009, Held as Part of HCI International 2009, San Diego, CA, USA, July 19-24, 2009 Proceedings

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